Thursday, April 4, 2013

SUZUKI TU250X RIDE REVIEW


 
I have been asked about the Suzuki TU 250 a number of times since we bought it and thought it is time to write a review on this machine.  The Suzuki TU250 is a great bike.  I didn’t call it a great small bike or a great beginner bike or use any other qualifier.  Taken on its’ own, it is a worthy bike and that may explain why it is popular with riders of varying skill and experience.  Let’s take a look at it.
 
A bike that makes you smile
 

The TU250 doesn’t try to be a sport bike, a cruiser, or a touring bike.  Instead, it tries to be a bike that can carry its’ rider nearly anywhere and do it with grace and dignity.  Where this bike excels is in taking the rider down our secondary and back roads.  It is as if the bike wants you to become a part of the world you are traveling through.  It wants you to experience the smells, to feel the wind and the temperature of the air.  It wants you to look around and enjoy the scenery.  The seat is comfortable and the riding position puts no strain on your neck, back, arms or legs and it keeps your head and eyes up where they belong.

I don’t know the top speed of most of the bikes I have owned, and that includes this one.  It does seem most comfortable cruising in the 45 to 60 MPH range.  At 60 and beyond the wind begins to be too much for my comfort as well, so the bike is comfortable at speeds that match the speeds I most enjoy when riding without a windscreen.  Acceleration and top speed are not the strengths of this bike.  If top speed and acceleration are very important to you, there are better choices in bikes.  The TU250 does have enough acceleration and speed to flow with traffic on the roads it was made to travel.

The TU is so very light and agile that you need only think where you want it to go and you are there.  It is as if it is an extension of your thoughts and wishes.  Curving roads are a blast, yet when the pavement gives way to gravel or dirt, this bike continues on completely at ease with the new surface.  If the going gets bumpy or sandy you can stand on the pegs to keep the bike stable and the ride smooth.  The light weight (326 pounds fully fueled) that makes it so nice to ride also make it a breeze to move around the garage or ride at parking lot speeds.

My wife and I are 5’4” and 5’8” tall and the bike fits us perfectly.  I have read reports of taller riders fitting fine as well.  So the bike is a comfortable and enjoyable travel companion and explorer.  It is also a very good looking bike, at least to most people’s eyes.  It has no beak and it doesn’t where clothing that makes it look like a caricature of a motorcycle.  It is designed on the style that was once known as a “standard” bike, but is now rather rare.  Park the bike and people will walk up to it for a closer look and if you happen to be nearby you can expect them to quiz you about its’ age and if you restored it.  How nice is that!  A bike that can introduce you to the joys of back road riding and also introduce you to new friends!

The TU250 gets great gas mileage.  Ours usually tops 90 MPG and has had a low of 84 MPG.  That coupled with a 3.2 gallon fuel tank and you can expect a 250 mile range with good reserves.

Over the years motorcycles have become specialized.  We can purchase what are essentially street legal race bikes, enormous and comfortable touring bikes, street legal dirt bikes with 10 inches of suspension travel and gigantic cruisers that weigh in excess of 800 pounds.  All these bikes are fantastic at what they were designed to do, but they give much away at the far side of their particular specialty.  Everyone can look at this Suzuki and name a specialty bike that does something better that it can, but there are very few that can deliver as much fun and enjoyment as this bike can.

I have owned many bikes, yet this one is one of my all-time favorites.  Maybe even THE all-time favorite.

Links you might like.
TU250X Review
TU250X Mountain Climb
TU250X Ride
TU 250 in Bryson City, NC video
Yamaha SR400/SR500 Review

73 comments:

  1. Thanks for the review....sounds like a machine I'd have a lot of fun with.

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  2. Thanks Coop. The bike is great and will take you anywhere you want to go. If we ever get over thinking we need something faster, bigger, more powerful, we'll find a whole world of truly great bikes and we will ride them to places we wouldn't think of taking more specialized bikes. Hope you are enjoying the ride articles as well!

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  3. I have a TU250X as well approaching 16k miles. To answer the top speed thing, it is over 90 indicated MPH. You need to be tucked in to do that though. For everyday highway riding, it will hold 80 indicated MPH for extended periods of time.

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    1. Thanks for the information. My guess is that with 16K on your bike you are enjoying it as much as we are ours. We had planned a ride down the Blue Ridge this past weekend, but couldn't pull it off. Expect a write-up on the Blue Ridge and the TU250X later this year.

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  4. My TU 250 has 4K on it and has gotten 90mpg. However, when I start it cold it sounds knocky and rattly. I broke it in carefully, but I'm concerned about the engine. The dealer says it's normal. Does that sound right?

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    1. Hi Anonymous, I have debated all day whether to reply or not simply because there is so much poor advise given on forums and blogs that I fear becoming another. Generally, I trust a shop more than this type of reply. Having said that... Our TU 250 starts and runs quietly whether it is started cold or hot. So I don't have much to relate to your noise. I always start troubleshooting with the simplest and move to the more complex. I am guessing that once it warms, the noise either goes away or at least gets better. A noise like that is usually something simple like a valve that is a little loose. You can use a dowel or other rod to place against your ear and the engine when the engine is running and making the rattle sound. Especially listen around the cylinder head. If this seems to be the location of the noise, you can adjust the valves, if you are one that enjoys this type of work. There IS good advise on the internet for this simple procedure. If you want details on the procedure let me know and I'll send them to you.

      You no doubt already know, but the first valve adjustment is at 600 miles with the second at 3000 miles then at 3000 mile intervals from that point on.

      If you don't like or don't feel comfortable setting your valves, take your bike to another dealer for a second opinion.

      Most dealers really are very reputable and they want happy customers, so if your dealer told you there was no problem, there probably is not, just the same a second opinion can make you feel comfortable if you have any doubts.

      Please let me know what you find out.

      B. R.

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  5. Thanks for the informative reply, B.R. - your recommendations make a lot of sense. I know that without hearing my engine start up, it's impossible to conclude anything for certain. I will probably find another shop for a second opinion as you suggested. Sometimes I think a shop may not want to concede there's a problem in order to avoid dealing with warranty repair issues, etc., but that's probably nonsense. I do really like the bike and hope to put many enjoyable miles on it. I'll be sure to post what I find out. Anonymous.

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    1. Yes please do let us know. The bike is a fine motorcycle and should give many many miles of trouble free riding. Best of luck!

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  6. I bought one of these a few months back and it is a blast. It has the power to take my 210 pound body to speeds up to 70 mph. The riding position is comfortable for a 71 inch person as well. All my friends that ride comment that they wish they had bought one for the sharp retro looks.

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  7. Thanks for the information Anonumous. This bike is building quite a following, and I am happy to see it happening. It is a great bike that deserves to be ridden and enjoyed by many.

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  8. thanks for the detailed review. I just bought that bike. Last weekend I took it for a 160 mile ride on mountain byways. Indeed- it was a fun ride, and i ablolutly agree with your statement - it wants you to see, smell and feel the surrounding air.
    And yes - I am also getting comments about how "calassic" the bike looks.

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    1. Hi Anonymous, very glad to hear you are enjoying your new bike. I think and hope the TU250 will develop a large following. They are a little hard to find on the used market, so I know they are being held on to. We have no plans to sell ours and it'll stay with us for a very long time. Please keep us posted on your experiences with this great bike!

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  9. I am 42 and brand new to riding. This bike sounds perfect for my needs. I would like to be able to do some highway time @ 60 to 70 mph. Would it be worth it to look at the Suzuki boulevard s40 for the extra engine displacement? I know it is more of a cruiser than the tu250. I will be buying something after my MSF class in 2 weeks. Appreciate any feedback.

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  10. Hi Anonymous,
    That is a tough question that I am not really able to answer. That answer needs to come from you. I have ridden the S40 and like it very much. It is also a very light bike and a true joy to ride. The TU250 is capable of 70 MPH on the highway and some riders do this regularly, I just don't like running it down the highway at that speed. We have had the bike out on short sections of divided highway where we reached and cruised at 65-70 for short stretches.

    Try to decide what you will really be doing with your new bike, where you will spend most of your time riding and how often you will need a bike capable of traveling at 70 for extended periods. Both the bikes you are considering are excellent machines and both will give you pleasure. I hope you will keep us informed of your choice and how you enjoy the MSF course.

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    1. Thanks for your input. I am leaning toward the tu250 based on all the positive reviews around the web. And even though there are interstates all around me, it will be more fun to take all the secondary routes to get places. Thanks again for making your review about a great bike and not keep calling it a "beginners" bike! Will post again when I take my first ride

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    2. Funny you mention beginner bike. There are many bikes that are easier to live with and will take care of the less experienced rider better than others, but it seems the word beginner becomes a distasteful moniker rather than a compliment. I see the TU250X as an great bike, not a great "beginners'" bike, although it will take care of its' rider.

      The TU250 is not designed for the highway, but it will take its' rider to so many wonderful places it given the chance. I have friends that have "started" on large bikes, and this is unfortunate as they will never experience the beauty and wonder of a light bike. I think you'll be happy with the TU. After 45 years on bikes of all sizes and performance levels, I have always had and preferred the smaller lighter bikes in my stable. Today my wife and I took a short ride and she picked the TU and I rode the cruiser, Both are great machines, but if I'd have gotten to the garage first, she'd have been on the cruiser while I enjoyed the TU.

      Keep us posted!

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    3. I just barely tested and put my down payment textd a 2013 tu250 today. I've been researching this bike for long enough to know that I want one. And I didn't have to research long. I've owned a couple different bikes myself and I can appreciate not titling this bike a "beginner". Although a new rider would do well with this bike, I have discovered that this bike is fully capable of delivering on such a variety of needs, I too working label this anything other than a fantastic bike. I'm 6' 4" in height, which is why I wanted to test one before I bought it, and I was surprised to learn how well I actually fit! Before I take her fine, I'm having the dealer change the sprocket on the front for one with an extra tooth to cruise more comfortably at highway speed. I'm am throughly excited to begin my journey sharing my life with this bike's life and how to make them both long and happy! I appreciate the info I've gathered here.

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    4. Nice to hear from you. Hope you will keep us up to date on your adventures with your TU. I've been tempted to switch sprockets as well, so am curious how you like the change. The way we ride, we are happy, but still always considering what else could be.

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  11. I have been reading reviews on different small bikes for a couple of months, and believe I have decided to buy the TU250 for my wife... It was between the TU and the Honda Rebel, but, I see alot more positive out here on the TU, I'll get back to you with my report in a couple of weeks...

    Thank you,

    C. Burruz

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  12. We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the TU. It seems to be liked by nearly everyone, and certainly by us!

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  13. If anyone has any doubts about taking this bike on a long trip, I am reminded of a story I read about a couple of guys who were HS friends, and had recently come back into communication with each other, after 40+ years of not seeing each other.
    The summer after their senior year in HS, they decided to take a trip and rode to Alaska....on Honda S90's, which were in production then.
    I figure if someone can make a trip like that on a 90cc engine, then long trips with a 250 should be a breeze.
    ...oh yeah, and all those years later, they decided to repeat their trip and found a couple of restored S90's to make the trek with.
    Don't know how it turned out, but I'm sure they had a great time.

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  14. I agree that the TU250 is capable of long distance riding and have been half heartedly planning a nice longish trip in my head. Nothing like heading to Alaska, more like a week long 1500 - 2000 miler. Just the same the TU250 is not a highway bike, but the best rides and scenery are on the back roads anyway. When you consider the great small bikes that are available today, it is a little surprising they are so often overlooked by experienced riders, although the Suzuki TU250 does seem to be bucking that trend.

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  15. I first posted on aug 3rd and I just finished my MSF course. I was lucky to get a few year old tu250 to use. Will be buying one this week and can't wait to get on the road. Will keep you informed

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  16. Congratulations on completing the MSF course! I believe you will enjoy your TU250. Would really like to hear your impressions of the bike and hope you'll keep us posted on your adventures with it.

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  17. I have had the tu250 now for 10 days and have 200 miles on it. Again, this is my first bike I ever had so take review with that in mind. I can't imagine a bike with a better seat position. I also am impressed with the suspension, I don't feel every bump at all. It certainly is fun on the country roads and like you posted before, it feels very comfortable traveling b/w 45 and 60 mph on open road. I will say 4th gear seems a bit weak, but once in 5th it cruises fine. If interested, I will have other observations as time goes on!

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  18. Very glad to hear you are enjoying the TU 250. It would be super if you'd write a report from your perspective. Would be happy to post it as a blog article rather than just a comment if you'd like.
    I had read another report where the author mentioned a rather interesting observation that was the same as yours, that the bike doesn't accelerate hard, but does seem to have plenty of power to cruise and feels good once up to speed. I agree, it is a little amazing that it cruises so effortlessly even though it cannot really race up to speed.
    This bike has a charm of its' own and I truly enjoy it and plan to keep it for many years. Am half considering a really long trip on it as well as a couple shorter trips. We will see whether it actually becomes a reality.

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  19. Just a quick question - I'm about 280 lbs.
    Would I notice any "minus's" using this bike, like bottoming out the suspension, or constant downshifting on hills?
    I'm pretty sure that weight is around the upper limit of the bike's listed load capacity.
    ...btw, a couple of ideas for a long cruise - Highway 101 down to Northern California, or a trip west to Cape Flattery.

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    1. Hi Thanks for reading the posts! Your question is one I cannot give you a good answer to. Power is something the TU250 does not have a lot of. It seems to pull well at the cruise speeds it is designed for, but it does not accelerate hard, you might politely call it "stately". We haven't bottomed the suspension, but you do have me by a few pounds in the weight department, so not sure what the actual performance will be for you. The manual gives the bike a max. vehicle weight of 780 pounds and it weights 326 with a full tank of fuel.

      It would be nice if you could find one to ride a few miles,that would help you make an informed decision. There are many good bikes out there, Kawasaki made the Vulcan 500 until a year or two ago and Suzuki makes the S40. Both are cruisers and while the displacement is bigger than the TU250, they are still very friendly bikes that could be ridden for many years and many many miles. They are relatively light, but heavier than the TU250.

      I appreciate your suggestions on good rides, I'll pull out my maps and take a look.

      Please let us know what you decide and if you get a TU250, we'd appreciate a ride report. (Actually a ride report on anything you get would be nice)

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  20. I now have over 600 miles on my tu250. The first 3 fill ups I got 86 mpg consistently. My fill up today got 62 mpg. I expected a drop off because that fill up included my first long trip (112 miles averaging 55 to 60 mph). My other fill ups were on short trips, mostly country roads, 30 to 40 on average. But, this drop off seems to be a bit excessive. Does this seem odd or normal? There were times on my long trip I was going 65 to 70 mph, but no more than 10 miles at this speed. What do you think?

    By the way, still impressed how responsive this little bike is going from 50 mph up to 70 mph.

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    1. Glad to hear you are enjoying your TU250. Seems the more we ride ours the more we appreciate what it is and what it does. We plan to have our for many years. I almost wish we had two as we both seem to want to ride the TU when we go out. I wouldn't worry much about that low mileage tank. Could have been a number of factors that caused it. Maybe you could put your thoughts about the bike together and we can include them here. I'd really like to write an article that included reviews from multiple TU250 owners. The bike is gathering a rather strong following and I'd like to help give it the exposure it deserves.

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  21. I have had the tu250 now for 10 days and have 200 miles on it. Again, this is my first bike I ever had so take review with that in mind. I can't imagine a bike with a better seat position. I also am impressed with the suspension, I don't feel every bump at all. It certainly is fun on the country roads and like you posted before, it feels very comfortable traveling b/w 45 and 60 mph on open road. I will say 4th gear seems a bit weak, but once in 5th it cruises fine. If interested, I will have other observations as time goes on!

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  22. It would be great to learn of your rides and your opinions on the TU250. We really enjoy ours and we are planning some rides with friend on similar sized bikes in the future. It is a blast and it'll take it's rider to many places and be a good travelling companion. Please keep us up to date on your adventures!

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  23. I came across your site and like many others I love my 250! I bought my brand new in 2012 and have about 4,000 miles on it. The only thing I do not like is I really need a sissy bar (backrest) for the back seat and it seems like no one makes one. My husband has a bike and he is getting to the point that he doesn't want to ride with me since I don't want to go on highway with my dd on the back. We would put her on his bike if it wasn't for the fact he he riding a sports bike and she doesn't like it. If I don't find a sissy bar soon I will have no choice but to upgrade my bike.
    With all the people up here could anyone help me? Anyone with a website that I could order this from can email me at..
    emrald_dragon_creations@yahoo.com

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    1. I'll look to see what I can find. We have made any modifications to ours, so we haven't looked. I do have some sources though and will poke around a bit for you.

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  24. Thanks for the great review!! I'm (fingers crossed) getting my bike license within the month and doing my research. This bike is totally a contender.

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  25. We really like this bike. It seems to do everything, but doesn't want a steady diet of turnpike or interstate travel. It is made for the more enjoyable aspects of motorcycling. It is a nice bonus that it attracts so much attention.

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  26. I currently live near Raleigh and am interested in this bike as a commuter and for weekend rides. It falls within my budget and is the classic look I am going for. I would also like to be able to ride up to Asheville for the weekends. Would that be too far, and too uphill of a climb for the bike? It would be around 250mi and up Old Fort, or up toward Boone.

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  27. Hi Anonymous, You can tell from other comments and the article in general that I am a big fan of the TU250. Few others would, but I'd ride it coast to coast as long as I could stick to the secondary roads. We had planned to take our TU to the Little Switzerland area of NC this past summer, but weather kept us from this. I am confident it would have done well, although I think patience would be in order when climbing the hills. I have a blogger friend that says hills were not a problem for her when she had a TU and she rode the mountains of Oregon. There is also a link at the end of this article that is a ride up a mountain and back down. That ride took place by another rider that lives in the NC area. I would definitely ride it 250 miles round trip or one way for a weekend trip, and have. The TU is one of the most enjoyable bikes I have ever owned and I recommend it to others. There is a slightly larger bike, the Yamaha SR400, that will be hitting the dealers in about 2 months, but the price new is about $6000, so it is a little pricey compared to the TU, but it will offer much the same motorcycle experience with a little more power. Either way these bikes are not about power and they really need to be experienced and enjoyed for what they are. My wife and I really like the 250 and if we could find another in as nice a shape as the one we already have, we'd probably have two... Please keep us posted on your decision and also your impressions of the bike if you do buy one. Best of luck! and enjoy whatever choice you make.

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  28. So I ended up not going with the Suzuki.. I was torn between it and the yamaha sr400--that seems like a really sweet bike, but I thought it was a little too expensive for a first bike... I recently completed my MSF course this past weekend and rode a tu250 the entire time. Great bike and fun to ride.

    Prior to the course I purchased a 1975 Honda cb360t from someone off of craigslist in my city. It was a great deal, and far cheaper than anything new. It only has 10,000 miles and is seemingly in excellent condition considering it's a 40 year old bike. So far it starts right up every time. I plan on learning how to deal with the carbs, oil changes, plugs, etc. so as a first bike I think it is a great fit as far as learning about mechanics is concerned.

    Thanks for the insight, it weighed heavily on my decision. I am pleased I was able to "test ride" a tu250 during the course, great bike and look forward to the chance I get to ride one again. I am in love with the sr400 and might snag one in a couple years if I can find a good deal.

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  29. You made a very good choice with the CB360. I have thought very much about owning and restoring a Honda 350 or 360 with my preference being the 360. I hope you will keep us posted on your adventures on the CB360, I love you hear your views on the bike and see your adventures.

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    1. I posted once broke here, but speaking of cb's, last year I searched and found a 1972 cb450 dohc with 10000 original miles! Kick starts with no battery, but needs a bit of work just cause its been sitting for soooo long. But, while that bike is being processed, I wanted something I could ride and have fun with. Research didn't year long to price that this suzuki tu250 is exactly what Im looking for. A fun bike to ride with the weight, gas mileage, and style I'm looking for. I'm the one having the dealer replace the front sprocket before I take her home. But, I too am a huge fan of the Honda xb series! Glad to see that my taste is valid among other intelligent riders!

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    2. ...Sorry, my phone auto corrects and there's some mis-typed words... Cb series is what I meant...

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  30. Hi,

    This is Ron from Northern Nevada. I just started researching this bike today although I had known about it for some time. I've taken an interest as I just sold my bike (a 2006 Kawasaki z750s) a week ago, telling myself that I wasn't going to ride for awhile. You see, at 44 I shouldn't be getting tickets for going 95 mph on I-80. That's just not smart, so I resolved to sell my bike and forget about riding for a while. Well, that lasted about a week, and now I'm looking for a classic bike that will keep me in the fun but also keep me out of trouble. This little bike looks just like the (right kind of) ticket :-)

    What about aftermarket parts, like luggage racks, etc. I usually go to twisted throttle for accessories but they don't have much for the TU250. I saw some links to Japanese websites but that seems problematic to me (at least until I brush up on it :-), so I'm wondering where folk go for their goodies.

    I also really appreciate reading those long-term reports from old hands. I've gone back to lower displacement bikes in the past without regret, but an experienced rider's report is always something I read with great attention. Not to say new riders don't count; it's great to have new folk in the garage and I love reading their impressions, too. Keep 'em coming!

    I'll let you know if I get one for carving up the Sierra back roads (and staying far away from I-80).

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    1. Hi Ron, there are a number of generic after market accessories like tank and tail bags. We did put a very small windshield on. I have not really looked for much else. Maybe another reader can offer suggestions.

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  31. Back road - Just found this video on Youtube. The guy swapped out the front sprocket on his TU250, changing it from 15 teeth to 16 teeth and it seems to have improved performance.
    Thought you might be interested in the results.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmafs8WX7_8

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    1. Thanks for sharing the video with us. Have you made this swap?

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  32. Sorry, I did not make the video and have no association with it. I just saw it on Youtube and thought you might be interested on the results this guy got.

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  33. I don't see a way to edit posts, so I'll just make another one.
    I am the guy who posted the youtube link above, concerning changing the front sprocket.
    I think I may have misunderstood your response to that post, so I'm posting, what I think, may be a correction.
    I don't own one of these bikes, but am interested in them.
    Thus, no, I have not performed this modification.
    ...however...
    I found another vid that shows just how to do that swap.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkibrlgqL_A

    According to a post on that Youtube page by the person who made the video, the change results in raising the gear ratio by 6.7%.
    Apparently, the gearing for the bike, as it leaves the factory, is quite low and this change makes for slightly taller gearing, apparently making the bike better able to handle freeway speeds and he also states that it makes first gear more useful.
    I hope you find this information helpful.

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  34. A great blog - thank you! I am considering TU250X, seems to THE bike I may have been searching, after going through too many bikes to mention. I was possibly looking for a bike like this, but may be, the though of riding a "smaller capacity" bike had to be accepted by my mind to enjoy what this bike has to offer!

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  35. sorry for the errors! corrected:
    A great blog - thank you! I am considering TU250X, seems to be THE bike I may have been searching, after going through too many bikes to mention. I was possibly looking for a bike like this, but may be, the thought of riding a "smaller capacity" bike had to be accepted by my mind to enjoy what this bike has to offer!

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  36. We really have gotten into the mind set that bigger is always better, but that is not always the case. Really depends on what you will enjoy. I think there is a lot of advise to buy big from our friends and also the manufacturers. I would be giving just as much ill advise by telling everyone to buy small, so I will stop short of that. I will say I have had and still own bikes of various sizes and styles. I like the big bikes and what they can do, but I also like the smaller bikes and what they can do. There is a reason that we ride our smaller bikes more than any others. For us at least, the small bikes offer more and they are the most pleasant to live with.
    Sometimes we just don't know what we want or exactly what fits our riding styles best because we have not yet defined what gives us the most pleasure. For anyone in that position, I would definitely recommend smaller and lighter bikes. Please keep us up to date on what you do and your adventures, regardless of the bike you choose. PS: the TU is still one of my all time favorite bikes.

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    1. Yes, I agree about the mindset that we get into due to inputs from various sources, also being seen on big bike becomes am ego thing and your mind does not want you be seen on a small bike and feeling "small" to others. I have had bikes from 50 cc to 1800 cc, and had come to the conclusion that the sweet range for me was 600 to 900 cc. However, now I am over "image" issue. I did go and test ride a TU and felt it just right and loved it, except for the tame sounding exhaust. An after market exhaust would solve that. I also did a test ride on a Suzuki 250LC,and fell in love with that too! The LC exhaust and twin cylinder engine felt more lively and exciting, not to mention the addictive and mesmerizing beat. To be sure I went for another round of test ride on the TU last weekend and I discovered that the standard riding position (which has been my favourite all along) was putting a strain on my back even after a 20 minutes ride. I have a bad back since a few years and have been on cruisers with a back rest for comforting my back as I often take off on long rides (1000 to 3000 kms). So, I the TU is probably not going suit my requirements, inspite of loving it. I am more likely to go for the LC. One thing is certain, I am downsizing!
      Maybe I may have the TU for short rides, when I can afford an additional one.

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    2. Hi Janak, It took me a little time to find the LC and read about it. That is a model we don't have here, but it sure looks like a nice bike. Yamaha sells a 250 V twin here that I have always liked.
      I found it interesting that you had concluded bikes in the 600 - 900cc range were a sweet range for you. A friend and I recently had the same conversation and we came up with 500 - 750 as a great range for the do it all bike. That is ride 2 up and be able to travel interstate highways, or just poke around the back roads. However, when I think about how I prefer to ride, bikes in the 200 - 500 range are nearly ideal. I am a person that would ride a bike in that range anywhere, although I'd stay off the interstate highways.
      I'd really like to hear about your bike adventures and hope you will keep us up to date on your rides!

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  37. I have the 2009 V Star xv250 which is the same as the Yamaha Virago 250 and have the V twin. My first bike was a 1979 Honda Hawk CB400, then a Honda Magna V30 500cc V4. Since I ride into DC, I wanted a bike that is light, get good gas mileage, but able to go on the highway when needed. I noticed that I like riding on country roads at 45-55 mph. I have changed the front sprocket from a 16 to a 17 which reduced rpm by 6% and the bike feels more relax. A girl I know just purchased a Tu250x but we have not ride together yet as to compare. I have gotten up to 85 mph indicated and the bike feels stable, but would not want to maintain speed above 75 mph for long cruise. 60 mph would be comfortable. I was reading Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance about a father and son riding 2 up and with camping gear and luggage from Minnesota to San Francisco on a 1964 Honda Superhawk CB77 which is 305cc. I just completed a 10,600 miles 6 weeks around country trip in my Miata back in September but now I feel I want to do a trip on my 250. Maybe a shorter trip. I think small displacement 250-500 bikes are making a comeback.

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  38. Hi,
    I was wondering, with a few modifications would the tu250x be suitable as an adventure bike ?

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  39. Hi,
    I was wondering, with a few modifications would the tu250x be suitable as an adventure bike ?

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    Replies
    1. I would ride this bike across the USA without modifications. It is suitable for back country roads and light gravel roads like forest service roads as it is. It wouldn't be as comfortable as a big cruiser or touring bike, but the adventure would be real and enjoyable. Would love to hear about your plans both for modifications and adventure.

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    2. How's your TU running and how many miles have you ridden on it so far? Do you have any special rides or events planned for 2016? I have ridden a few miles but it turned cold again and is supposed to be for the next couple weeks (low 30°F range). Hard to find adequate eye protection for that range . . .

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    3. We've put on about 70,000 miles on the bikes in our garage. The bigger bikes rack up miles a little quicker than the light bikes, but that is because they can travel faster and when we need to Get somewhere, we choose them first. The TU 250 and the SR 400 are ridden more often, but they tend to take us on less hurried rides where the ride is the center of focus rather than the destination. This means we spend time on the more enjoyable back roads and we stop to take pictures, enjoy the surroundings, and so forth. Plenty of time in the saddle, but shorter distance rides. That said, we have about 10,000 split evenly between the TU and the SR. Both are great fun and will stay in our stable.

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  40. My wife started riding last year for the first time after years of being a passenger on my DL1000. Taking the MSF course was on her milestone birthday bucket list (dare I say half century). I told her if she passed her course and got her MC endorsement that I would buy her a bike. She passed the course with flying colors that weekend and proudly showed me her new MC endorsement the following Tuesday. She had been stalking the TU at various motorcycle shows for a couple of years. I felt she was on the right track by picking the TU as a first motorcycle so I ordered one the Tuesday she showed me her new endorsement. 4500 miles later, the TU has been the perfect bike for her. I have enjoyed riding the twisty back roads of North Georgia, as well as Tennessee and North Carolina, with her. For her half century +1 birthday this year she slayed the Tail of the Dragon on her TU. The TU has taken her from Key West to Lake Okeechobee in Florida without a hitch. She loves this bike and she's not afraid of it. Guys, if your wife is considering riding a motorcycle for the first time take a good look at the TU250X it will serve her well. Unfortunately, that new Ducati Scrambler has caught her eye. We will see where that goes.

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  41. HELLO from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada!
    After 12 yrs of riding 49 cc's, have upgraded and picked up a 2015 TU250X (in January) in very good condition. TUX is currently in winter storage at the dealer, and will be brought home soon.
    Have obtained my m/c learners for the course, which hopefully runs at the end of April.
    I am absolutely STOKED about the course and getting out on TUX to enjoy the short(er) riding season here, in this part of the world.
    Your blog, and research done at this end, have satisfied me that I've made a good decision, and I look forward to enjoying TUX this year, and for many riding seasons to come.
    Thanks!
    GG in Winnipeg

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    Replies
    1. Have fun! Another few wks. or so and you'll be out there. I've used the sight too and purchased a TU. Got about 80 miles on 'er now. It's quite different but extreme fun.

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    2. Hi GG, Would enjoy hearing more as you get time on the TU. We ride ours regularly and plan to keep it as it is a favorite ride. These bikes are sometimes hard to find but well worth the search. We ride the TU and our SR together and the TU always amazes with its smoothness and willingness to takes us down any road we chose to ride.
      It attracts attention everywhere it goes!

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    3. HI there!...just a quick note to let you know that all went well with the m/c course last year. Rode right up to the beginning of December. Was out in early spring, and passed the road test this past May.
      Have already put 12,000 kms on my bike since last year.
      Raised the handlebars 1 1/2 ", put a windshield on, suitcase, saddlebags, and new tires, along witb an oil change/filter.
      This 250 IS SO MUCH FUN!!
      Having a great time learning, and enjoying this new sport and all the wonderful helpful people that also ride.
      Two of our grandchildren have been out with me, and absolutely love going out for a ride with their GG.
      How can I send you a couple of photos?

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  42. Greetings. Just purchased a new 2016 TU205X yesterday. I have had many other bikes over the years and still also have a 2012 Suzuki DL-1000, but I love the TU. The TU reminds me of my first motorcycle; a brand new 1982 Kawasaki CSR 305. This sight and many others helped me decide to get a new Tux and I am so happy that I did. I could not find one bad thing about the TU250s out there on the net. Once I test drove one at my local Suzuki dealer I knew I had to have one. Thanks to all for the info, comments and insights. And also, thank you to the founder and proprietor of this great blogspot!

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    1. Hi Big X 250, Glad to hear you enjoy this blog. We haven't written in a while as life got a bit busy, but we believe we now have time to get back to the blog. We've made some good rides on the TU and SR that deserve to be shared.
      Please keep us posted on your TU adventures!

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    2. Thanks Back Road. I'd like to also hear more about the TR. Glad to know you will be getting more involved in the blog again. Keep up the great work!

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    3. Will keep you up to date on the TU and SR adventures. The TU is certainly smoother. Turns out there are quite a few of us that have one of each. The SR has a charm of its' own but the TU feels more modern somehow. We regularly switch back and forth between bikes when we take them both out. I seem to think which ever one I am riding at the time is the better bike. Truth is they are both very good at what they were designed to do.

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  43. How is the kick starter on the SR? I was going to test drive one when I test drove the TU a few weeks ago, but the higher price and kick starter kind of dampened interest. It's nice to see a few new smaller displacement bikes being produced again. Remember the old Kawasaki 440 LTDs? How cool were those???

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  44. I also like the 440 LTDs, but never had one. The SR usually starts on the first kick, sometimes, but rarely on the second. It is easy, but different than pushing a button. The fuel injection and electronic ignition make a world of difference from the 60s and 70s bikes that needed a kick. I would (and didn't) not let that stop me from buying one. It becomes part of the fun as you know most other riders don't know how to kick start a bike.

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  45. Good to know that the new SR 400s are not too difficult to start. They sure have a very appealing classic appearance. Nice and shiny with lots of chrome. I wish it would warm up here. Temps still only in high 30s/ low 40s. Hard to find good eye protection for riding that won't fog up. Other than that, I would still bundle up and ride anyway . . .

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  46. Rode Tux to run a few errands today. Only 41°F so I wore my full-faced helmet and River Road "Cheyenne" cold weather gloves. They work pretty good for short jaunts as long as it's not much below 40 -- then nothing works! Put on 19 miles. Now have 98 miles and am really enjoying it. Handles very good in traffic and is actually quite thrilling to ride i.e., you don't take anything for granted!

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